Some observations from travels

Farewell Summer…Hello Spring!

I’m back! and so glad to be.  Now you might be wondering why it is Spring after Summer.  Well my few weeks of absence have been occupied by transitioning from Japan and back to Australia.  So in the process I bid adieu to Japan, in the northern hemisphere, during summer and entered Australia, in the southern hemisphere, towards the end of winter.

In the last few weeks I spent in Nagoya I got to enjoy some summer festivals – Japanese matsuri style.  So here are some photos of famous summer festivals in Japan.  I hope you enjoy it.

Tanabata in Ichinomiya.  Tanabata, also known as the Star Festival, in Ichinomiya is one of the three biggest Tanabata festivals in Japan.  Celebrated during the last weekend of July (25th-28th) this year.  The festivities builds up from Thursday to the grand climax on Sunday.  Anyone is welcome to celebrate with the locals.  Many come in their beautiful yukatas, enjoy the music and colourful fukinagashi (streamer) decorations, write up their wishes on the tanzaku, and feast on yummy street food!

Bon Odori in Goju Hachiman.  Bon dancing is a traditional dancing that locals do to welcome their departed spirits during the bon week.  When one wants to join in the biggest and best bon dancing, or all night bon dancing, one visits Goju Hachiman.  I was particularly curious about this event in summer.  Bon dancing is so cool, I couldn’t help myself but join in the fun!

Goju Hachiman is well known for it’s small traditional town image maintained since the 17th century.  The town is very easy to walk through and the locals are friendly.  Have you been to a cafe or restaurant and saw your meal displayed on the window?  Plastic replicas of food are very famous around Japan and many asian countries and out here you get to experience making one!  Goju Hachiman is the centre of making food replicas.

What seemed like a sleepy town came to life after dark when suddenly people were walking through the streets, dressed in their yukatas, started making their way to a part of the town where the dancing was happening that night.  After dancing all night you can stay over in one of the many ryokans where, if you haven’t got a yukata, usually lends their guests their very own ryokan-inspired yukata for you to dance in.

So these were two of the many summer festivals in Japan and I am so glad to share them with you.  In my next posts I will show you fun places I visited during my finals weeks in the wonderful country of the rising sun.  I hope to see you again very soon!

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4 responses

  1. Fabulous pictures. I’ve never seen celebrations such as these and didn’t know what fukinagashi was. So, thanks for helping me understand this culture better. http://ohtheplaceswesee.com

    September 5, 2013 at 9:17 am

  2. It’s nice to see the traditional Japanese arts & festivals. And than you for the follow – I appreciate it!

    September 18, 2013 at 11:29 am

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